[Post Reply] [*]  Page 6 of 9  [ 84 posts ]  Go to page « 14 5 6 7 8 9 »
Author Message
Trojan
Post subject: Re: The Centennial AUPosted: June 26th, 2012, 12:04 am
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 1216
Joined: March 26th, 2012, 4:29 am
Location: Big House
One thing you could do if you want to really extend the war you would have Hitler not declare war on the United States in 1941 after Pearl Harbor as he was not abided by the Tripartite Pact to declare war on the US unless they had attacked Japan
just food for though I don't know if this is really even a realistic idea

_________________
Projects:
Zealandia AU
John Company AU
References and feedback is always welcome!


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
SrGopher
Post subject: Re: The Centennial AUPosted: June 26th, 2012, 2:17 am
Offline
Posts: 371
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 9:21 pm
Revised TV-1A:
[ img ]

I didn't really enlarge the nacelles that much just because I want to keep similar to the drawing that this aircraft is based off of:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Platt ... _PL-16.jpg

Please note that this is an AU, and that this is the only that I will be modifying the engines on this aircraft unless I see fit.

Centennia's "Neutral-Defensive" Policy restricted the Navy to operating almost exclusively as a self-defense force during the duration of any war. It also meant that all ships were to be dedicated to such duty, leaving the offensive ships at port until called upon for battle. But as an intermediate, Centennial yards put out 3 "Light Battleships" as a response to the planned German Deutschland class "pocket battleships", which were ideal raiders against Atlantic convoys going to and from Centennia. These were not in any way meant to fight full-fledged battleships, but they could perhaps damage any battleships that posed a threat to the convoy, as well as cripple or sink any cruiser that threatened the convoy. Unlike most battleships at the time, these vessels could reach a healthy 27 knots - a speed only beat by battlecruisers, and a few knots ahead of larger battleships. It could also keep temporary pace with cruisers, and could potentially serve in pairs to fight larger opponents. But overall, these vessels were not fit for toe-to-toe combat with battleships, and were meant to stall until the rest of the convoy could escape, break off from the engagement with the battleship, then speed back to the convoy. This doctrine was visually present in the design of the ships, being that the triple 14" gun turret was placed on the stern, able to add extra firepower to fight off an enemy combatant while the ship attempted to make an escape. By the beginning of the war, the class had been upgraded substantially, with the single DP 3" guns being replaced by twin DP 3" guns, and the .5" MGs being replaced by 20mm cannons, and the 20mm being augmented by 40mm cannons mounted in tandem with the twin 3" guns. The ship also had some primitive directors replace the massive spotting tops, as well as a modern mast and experimental radar and sonar suite added. The Cavalier and Chevalier served honorably in the Atlantic for the first months of the war, although in the Pacific, the Partisan had been hit on December 7, 1941, while anchored at Manila Bay near Fort Drum, providing an AA screen after word of the attack on Pearl Harbor reached the area. The ship limped away at 4 knots, and surprisingly made it to Australia two weeks later. The Paladin was given hasty repairs so it could help buff the defenses at Singapore, but the Japanese had closed off the waterways to the British fort. The Partisan instead sailed to the USP for more permanent repairs at the American base there. The Cavalier was sent to the Pacific, and with the Partisan, provided screens against Japanese aircraft and destroyers attacking American, Pacifican and Centennial convoys heading to Midway, Alaska, and Australia. Soon after, both vessels were caught at the USP in Puerto Oeste while preparing for departure. They were severely damaged by torpedoes as they went out into open sea, and while cruisers were taking up towlines to the crippled battleships, they were hit hard by an air attack, resulting in additional damage to the convoy and its escort. The Cavalier was able to limp back to port with the Partisan, but while taking repairs, the Partisan was hit by a large bomb, which wrecked much of the ship, rendering it uneconomical for repairs. The Chevalier had an eventful career in the Atlantic, and was assigned to cover the convoys in the South Atlantic from Centennia as German raiders were said to be in the region. Escorted by some British cruisers, the ship eventually found its designed adversary, the Admiral Graf Spee (This was not in 1939). The ship took a severe hit against the stern, almost destroying the steering gear, and crippling many of the compartments back there. But a salvo from the forward turret ended up wrecking the Graf Spee, forcing it to head into a neutral port. Having moved back beyond the horizon for a while, crews repaired the damage to the steering while the British cruisers went in just outside the port waiting for the German cruiser to come out. Eventually, the ship was scuttled at Montevideo, leaving the Chevalier as the only of the class to have fought its intended target. Later in the war, the ship was sent to England, where it served as a good escort for North Atlantic convoys heading to Norway. But off Norway, the vessel was struck by 3 torpedoes, crippling the ship. It steamed on under its own power back to Britain, but was suddenly hit by another torpedo, terminating the ship's ability to run on its own. While escorts took on the hunt for the source of the torpedo, the Chevalier was towed to England, where it was patched, sent to Centennia, and then sent to the Pacific to replace the stricken Partisan.


Anyway, here is the SS for a rather drastic change in vessel design that Centennia's "Neutral-Defensive" Policy had seen as needed to fight battleships attacking merchant convoys:
Quote:
Cavalier, Centennia Battleship laid down 1928

Displacement:
20,246 t light; 21,293 t standard; 23,492 t normal; 25,251 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
647.42 ft / 630.00 ft x 89.00 ft x 26.00 ft (normal load)
197.33 m / 192.02 m x 27.13 m x 7.92 m

Armament:
5 - 14.00" / 356 mm guns (2 mounts), 1,372.00lbs / 622.33kg shells, 1928 Model
Breech loading guns in turrets (on barbettes)
on centreline ends, evenly spread
4 - 3.00" / 76.2 mm guns in single mounts, 13.50lbs / 6.12kg shells, 1928 Model
Dual purpose guns in deck mounts with hoists
on side, all amidships
14 - 0.50" / 12.7 mm guns in single mounts, 0.06lbs / 0.03kg shells, 1928 Model
Machine guns in deck mounts
on side, evenly spread
Weight of broadside 6,915 lbs / 3,137 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 150

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 6.50" / 165 mm 370.00 ft / 112.78 m 11.50 ft / 3.51 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Main Belt covers 90 % of normal length

- Torpedo Bulkhead:
4.00" / 102 mm 310.00 ft / 94.49 m 22.50 ft / 6.86 m

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 8.50" / 216 mm 8.00" / 203 mm 13.2" / 335 mm
2nd: 1.00" / 25 mm 1.00" / 25 mm 1.50" / 38 mm
3rd: 0.50" / 13 mm 0.50" / 13 mm -

- Armour deck: 4.50" / 114 mm, Conning tower: 6.50" / 165 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 2 shafts, 76,287 shp / 56,910 Kw = 27.00 kts
Range 10,000nm at 15.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 3,957 tons

Complement:
948 - 1,233

Cost:
£6.747 million / $26.989 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 864 tons, 3.7 %
Armour: 7,342 tons, 31.3 %
- Belts: 1,221 tons, 5.2 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 1,032 tons, 4.4 %
- Armament: 1,673 tons, 7.1 %
- Armour Deck: 3,301 tons, 14.1 %
- Conning Tower: 115 tons, 0.5 %
Machinery: 2,375 tons, 10.1 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 9,664 tons, 41.1 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 3,246 tons, 13.8 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0.0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
42,233 lbs / 19,156 Kg = 30.8 x 14.0 " / 356 mm shells or 7.6 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.11
Metacentric height 5.1 ft / 1.6 m
Roll period: 16.5 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 85 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.59
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1.44

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck
Block coefficient: 0.564
Length to Beam Ratio: 7.08 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 25.10 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 52 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 59
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 23.00 degrees
Stern overhang: 4.30 ft / 1.31 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 30.90 ft / 9.42 m
- Forecastle (22 %): 26.70 ft / 8.14 m
- Mid (40 %): 22.50 ft / 6.86 m
- Quarterdeck (22 %): 22.50 ft / 6.86 m
- Stern: 24.00 ft / 7.32 m
- Average freeboard: 24.34 ft / 7.42 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 80.1 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 184.6 %
Waterplane Area: 39,648 Square feet or 3,683 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 124 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 167 lbs/sq ft or 814 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 1.00
- Longitudinal: 1.90
- Overall: 1.06
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is excellent
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Ship has slow, easy roll, a good, steady gun platform
Good seaboat, rides out heavy weather easily
I'm pretty new to Springsharp, and I don't really know what numbers mean in some cases, so if you see anything that doesn't make sense, just tell me.

_________________
Worklist:
Puerto Oeste - AU - WWI-WWII


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
SrGopher
Post subject: Re: The Centennial AUPosted: June 29th, 2012, 7:38 pm
Offline
Posts: 371
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 9:21 pm
At this point, I'm looking towards actually getting together some sort of naval combat and design philosophy for Centennia, rather than just draw whatever comes to mind. So, with that said, I'm also looking into creating a reasonably sized navy for a nation of this size (Although this may go away at some point). There will be a number of major changes to the Centennial fleet. First off, the New Rotterdam/Winchester class ships will be shrinking down to 8 (4 even between the two variants), and only 4 serving into WWII.

The New Rotterdam/Winchester class vessels all served well during the Great War, earning much prestige among the Allied Powers as formidable, heavy-hitting, albeit lightly armored, battlewagons. They served post-war as propaganda powerhouses, strengthening the patriotism of Centennia during heavily publicized naval parades and drills. But after the post-war economic boom was over, the world started to slow and fade away from the massive, military-focused political world as foreign ties began to repairs themselves. With that, and reflecting on the losses sustained by civilian ships of many nations during the war, Centennia moved towards a "Neutral-Defensive" Doctrine, renaming the Navy and Air Force's purpose as buffers to protect Centennial trade, and not be projecting power onto foreign nations. Massive cuts were made to the Navy's barely 10-year-old modern Blue-Water fleet, including half of the New Rotterdam/Winchester class vessels, as well as planned conversions of ex-German battlewagons into Centennial vessels. The 4 that were laid up remained in mothballs for 7 years, before 2 were sold off for scrapping. Another was used for spare parts for the 4 active ships, and the final vessel was outfitted to test various systems and ideas that the Centennial, American, and Pacifican Navies were developing jointly. By the beginning of WWII, the 4 remaining vessels were beginning to show age, even with continuous upgrades throughout their service lives. They were still pressed into service in the Neutrality Patrol (although Centennial units have been actively doing such during international crises throughout the last two decades). In 1940, the German cruiser Emden was almost the victim of the Centennial battlewagons after it opened fire on a Centennial-flagged convoy bound for England. Warning shots steered the delicate cruiser away from the convoy, being stalked for hundreds of miles back to the Netherlands by Centennial submarines. The ships served almost exclusively in the Pacific after the beginning of 1942, where they provided support to the USP against attacks by Japanese carriers and heavy units. But by mid-1943, all of the ships had suffered major damages, and the cost to repair each vessel for full combat duty considering their age was deemed uneconomical. Quietly, they were patched up, given a skeletal crew, and then sent back on convoy duty in the Atlantic armed only with a pair of 3" guns and 6 20mm cannons (They still appeared to be armed with their main guns thanks to various scraps of steel tubing and long wooden logs).

The second batch of the County class will be omitted form this AU. This means that the drawing posted previously will be scrapped. The Troy class was to be commissioned in 1935-40, remaining as is in terms of design and armament, although the airwing would be substantially different. The County class will still be constructed in conjunction of with the Troy class, although heavily revised, firing modified American 6"/47s with purpose-built AA rounds and temporary license-built British 40mm cannons. I will eventually get around to putting up and updated version, although I wouldn't expect that to be for a while.

Actually, here is the current list of ships due to be scrapped from this AU that have been mentioned before:
CNS Conroy (ex-Erstaz Yorck) - BC
CNS Cape Fear (ex-Macksensen) - BB
CNS Hunter (ex-Derrflinger) - CB
CNS Columbia/Berkshire (including top view) - BB (This is still in question)
CNS Nieuw Utrecht - BB
CNS Hampshire - BB
CNS Camelot - CL

[ img ]
This is still very much a WIP of the CNS Cavalier. But seeing as I have little knowledge of late-20's vessels, would anyone have any tips?

_________________
Worklist:
Puerto Oeste - AU - WWI-WWII


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Trojan
Post subject: Re: The Centennial AUPosted: June 29th, 2012, 9:39 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 1216
Joined: March 26th, 2012, 4:29 am
Location: Big House
Its a nice start but I think you need for powerful secondaries then 3in ones and maybe larger funnels? though I'm not positive about that
ohhh yeah and an armored belt and maybe less scuttles

_________________
Projects:
Zealandia AU
John Company AU
References and feedback is always welcome!


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
SrGopher
Post subject: Re: The Centennial AUPosted: July 14th, 2012, 3:21 am
Offline
Posts: 371
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 9:21 pm
Well, ever since I got Springsharp, I've been working on "mapping" out the hull of an AU ship based on dimensions put into the program. That, along with a boredom with trying to build Centennia's ships, I moved back and decided to work on Centennia's Pacific counterpart, the United States of the Pacific. This was just a trial run with Springsharp, although the ship will be part of the Pacifican fleet (Actually, try about 100 of these being in the fleet).

The Sniper class frigates were designed as smaller versions of the prestiged Sharpshooter class, which the Blue Water Flotilla wanted full control over for its Battle Fleet, rather than for convoy duty. The Sniper class was armed well to foreign standards, being perfectly capable of putting up an equal gunfight. The only thing they lacked compared to the Sharpshooter class were torpedoes, which, although were primary for foreign destroyers, proved to be of limited use on a ship that was aimed at protecting convoys. The Sniper class was built with mass-production in mind, and it used a high percentage of the same parts and fittings as the Sharpshooter class. The armament was geared mainly to AAW, but depth charge racks gave it a standard ASW armament for 1930’s standards. The ships proved to be much more suited to stormy seas than most comparable vessels thanks to the higher freeboard and deeper draft. Overall, these ships, along with the Sharpshooter class, were well-loved by their crews, although the lack of torpedoes was uncomfortable for Atlantic and Mediterranean crews facing surface raiders, eventually leading to the elimination of the single 3” gun aft and the replacement and repositioning of the single 40mm cannons to accommodate a set of triple torpedo tubes. The twin 3” gun forward was often replaced mid-war by Hedgehog launchers, although the twin 3” gun often replaced the single mount aft.These are the backbone of the escort fleet for both merchant convoys and naval squadrons, along with their larger, although highly similar destroyer cousins. Here is the SS report:

Sniper, United States of the Pacific Frigate laid down 1936

Displacement:
931 t light; 975 t standard; 1,134 t normal; 1,261 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
304.70 ft / 300.00 ft x 31.50 ft x 14.00 ft (normal load)
92.87 m / 91.44 m x 9.60 m x 4.27 m

Armament:
6 - 4.00" / 102 mm guns (3x2 guns), 32.00lbs / 14.51kg shells, 1936 Model
Dual-purpose guns in deck mounts
on centreline ends, majority forward
3 - 3.00" / 76.2 mm guns (1x2, 1x1), 13.50lbs / 6.12kg shells, 1936 Model
Dual-purpose guns in deck mounts
on side, all amidships
4 - 1.57" / 40.0 mm guns in single mounts, 1.95lbs / 0.88kg shells, 1936 Model
Anti-aircraft guns in deck mounts
on side, evenly spread
6 - 0.79" / 20.0 mm guns in single mounts, 0.24lbs / 0.11kg shells, 1936 Model
Anti-aircraft guns in deck mounts
on side, evenly spread
Weight of broadside 242 lbs / 110 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 150

Armour:
- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 1.00" / 25 mm - -
2nd: 1.00" / 25 mm - -
3rd: 0.50" / 13 mm - -
4th: 0.50" / 13 mm - -

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 2 shafts, 14,547 shp / 10,852 Kw = 28.80 kts
Range 5,000nm at 15.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 286 tons

Complement:
97 - 127

Cost:
£0.606 million / $2.426 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 30 tons, 2.7 %
Armour: 18 tons, 1.6 %
- Belts: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Armament: 18 tons, 1.6 %
- Armour Deck: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Conning Tower: 0 tons, 0.0 %
Machinery: 408 tons, 35.9 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 415 tons, 36.6 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 203 tons, 17.9 %
Miscellaneous weights: 60 tons, 5.3 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
623 lbs / 282 Kg = 19.5 x 4.0 " / 102 mm shells or 0.4 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.17
Metacentric height 1.2 ft / 0.4 m
Roll period: 12.2 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 100 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.49
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 2.00

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck
and transom stern
Block coefficient: 0.300
Length to Beam Ratio: 9.52 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 20.52 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 58 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 50
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 10.00 degrees
Stern overhang: 1.00 ft / 0.30 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 21.00 ft / 6.40 m
- Forecastle (22 %): 18.50 ft / 5.64 m
- Mid (40 %): 16.00 ft / 4.88 m
- Quarterdeck (22 %): 16.00 ft / 4.88 m
- Stern: 16.00 ft / 4.88 m
- Average freeboard: 17.00 ft / 5.18 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 142.7 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 203.2 %
Waterplane Area: 6,310 Square feet or 586 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 100 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 28 lbs/sq ft or 138 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0.44
- Longitudinal: 5.95
- Overall: 0.57
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is cramped
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Ship has slow, easy roll, a good, steady gun platform
Excellent seaboat, comfortable, can fire her guns in the heaviest weather


----Any discrepancies with the Springsharp report will be noted and fixed. I feel like this ship has an armament too good to be true, although Springsharp says that it is a well-balanced vessel.

[ img ]



EDIT: The Sharpshooter class will follow in the coming days.

_________________
Worklist:
Puerto Oeste - AU - WWI-WWII


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Trojan
Post subject: Re: The Centennial AUPosted: July 14th, 2012, 6:50 am
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 1216
Joined: March 26th, 2012, 4:29 am
Location: Big House
I like it looks like a super hunt class kinda

_________________
Projects:
Zealandia AU
John Company AU
References and feedback is always welcome!


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Novice
Post subject: Re: The Centennial AUPosted: July 14th, 2012, 11:30 am
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 4070
Joined: July 27th, 2010, 5:25 am
Location: Vrijstaat
Nice looking ship, but here some comments
- 4" guns in SS you say Majority forward, whereas in the drawing its the other way around.
- 3" guns are redundant, as the 4" guns were doing the same job, mainly AA work with some surface fire punch. The 3" was used by the USN while the RN used the 4".
- Your ship has long bows, which makes the hull, from midships to the aft section cramped, while the bows are empty and give buoyancy, and that means your ship can't maintain her speed while heading into heavy seas.
- Some details will be nice, like portholes, lifeboats etc.

_________________
[ img ] Thank you Kim for the crest

"Never fear to try on something new. Remember that the Titanic was built by professionals, and the Ark by an amateur"


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
SrGopher
Post subject: Re: The Centennial AUPosted: July 17th, 2012, 8:04 pm
Offline
Posts: 371
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 9:21 pm
These have been noted, and fixed. But hull portholes were not visible in contemporary vessels of the type, therefore they were not included.But here is the revised version:
[ img ]

But here is the original design that resulted in the Sniper class Frigate, the Sharpshooter class destroyer:
Sharpshooter, United States of the Pacific Destroyer laid down 1934

Displacement:
1,703 t light; 1,786 t standard; 2,160 t normal; 2,459 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
406.89 ft / 400.00 ft x 42.00 ft x 15.00 ft (normal load)
124.02 m / 121.92 m x 12.80 m x 4.57 m

Armament:
10 - 4.00" / 102 mm guns (5 mounts), 32.00lbs / 14.51kg shells, 1934 Model
Dual purpose guns in deck mounts
on centreline, distributed
Aft Main mounts separated by engine room
4 - 3.00" / 76.2 mm guns (2x2 guns), 13.50lbs / 6.12kg shells, 1934 Model
Dual purpose guns in deck mounts
on side, all amidships
4 - 1.57" / 40.0 mm guns in single mounts, 1.95lbs / 0.88kg shells, 1934 Model
Anti-aircraft guns in deck mounts
on side, evenly spread
4 - 0.79" / 20.0 mm guns in single mounts, 0.24lbs / 0.11kg shells, 1934 Model
Anti-aircraft guns in deck mounts
on side, evenly spread
Weight of broadside 437 lbs / 198 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 160
10 - 21.0" / 533.4 mm above water torpedoes

Armour:
- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 1.00" / 25 mm - -
2nd: 0.50" / 13 mm - -
3rd: 0.50" / 13 mm - -

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 2 shafts, 36,989 shp / 27,594 Kw = 34.00 kts
Range 8,000nm at 15.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 673 tons

Complement:
157 - 205

Cost:
£1.177 million / $4.707 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 55 tons, 2.5 %
Armour: 19 tons, 0.9 %
- Belts: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Armament: 19 tons, 0.9 %
- Armour Deck: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Conning Tower: 0 tons, 0.0 %
Machinery: 959 tons, 44.4 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 660 tons, 30.5 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 457 tons, 21.2 %
Miscellaneous weights: 10 tons, 0.5 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
793 lbs / 360 Kg = 24.8 x 4.0 " / 102 mm shells or 0.4 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.24
Metacentric height 2.0 ft / 0.6 m
Roll period: 12.5 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 100 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.29
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1.55

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck
and transom stern
Block coefficient: 0.300
Length to Beam Ratio: 9.52 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 23.69 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 60 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 85
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 15.00 degrees
Stern overhang: 1.00 ft / 0.30 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 22.00 ft / 6.71 m
- Forecastle (22 %): 19.00 ft / 5.79 m
- Mid (40 %): 16.00 ft / 4.88 m
- Quarterdeck (22 %): 16.00 ft / 4.88 m
- Stern: 16.00 ft / 4.88 m
- Average freeboard: 17.19 ft / 5.24 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 163.5 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 132.3 %
Waterplane Area: 11,217 Square feet or 1,042 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 83 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 34 lbs/sq ft or 166 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0.44
- Longitudinal: 2.00
- Overall: 0.51
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is cramped
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Ship has slow, easy roll, a good, steady gun platform
Excellent seaboat, comfortable, can fire her guns in the heaviest weather

[ img ]

The Sharpshooter class destroyers were designed as the all-purpose vessels of the Pacifican Navy, which uses most of its larger vessels as prestige symbols. In 1932, the Pacifican Navy was comprised of a single carrier, 2 obsolescent battleships, 2 battlecruisers, 2 heavy cruisers, 5 obsolescent light cruisers, and 49 obsolscent destroyers, as well as the Green Water Flotilla’s (Defensive arm of the Navy) minor patrol vessels and the light combatants of the Revenue Cutter Flotilla (Coast Guard). With this, as well as a heavy amount of British and American aid, the Pacifican Navy began to look towards expansion of its surface fleet to meet the threat that the Japanese posed with a Navy with nearly 3 times the amount of major combatants of the Pacifican Navy, and posed the greatest threat to the USP. Under high discretion, the USP also acquired plans for German U-boats, as well as a number of British, American, and French submarines. With the Pacifican Navy using its surface fleet for prestige, and the submarine program just getting started, it relied on the building of a destroyer fleet 200 vessels strong in order to provide the strong arm of the Navy. While foreign designs proved to be well rounded, they suffered the same flaws of having rather small armaments. While the Pacifican Navy’s contract called for a vessel that would have been considered a light cruiser in every sense except for the light armament of at least 8 4” guns and 4 3” guns, as well as at least 2 Swedish 40mm cannons, 4 Swiss 20mm cannons, and 10 torpedos. They all had rather large hulls for destroyers, and at a maximum 400 feet, they were the largest ever at the time for a destroyer, and proved to be even longer than some cruisers of WWI. This certain vessel provided a The ships were designed to pick up the slack of a lack of cruisers in the Navy by providing a great deal of firepower in a gunfight, even though they were merely 4” guns. The 3” guns were added to provide more dedicated AA armament rather than the DP main armament, which were assumed to be aimed fully on a surface combatant rather than on aircraft during an engagement. The war saw the reuse of the excellent hull for deploying a variety of weapons, and various variations were made on the later vessels of the class, ranging from the use of a purely 3” armament to mounting 5” guns, along with the acquisition of the vessel by several navies to operate as flotilla leaders for smaller foreign destroyers. Though many were lost during the war, they were sunk in engagements mainly involving larger combatants.

_________________
Worklist:
Puerto Oeste - AU - WWI-WWII


Last edited by SrGopher on July 18th, 2012, 12:25 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Novice
Post subject: Re: The Centennial AUPosted: July 17th, 2012, 9:33 pm
Offline
User avatar
Posts: 4070
Joined: July 27th, 2010, 5:25 am
Location: Vrijstaat
I like the Sharpshooter class very much, but my only critique concerns the propeller shafts, which IMHO, end too far from the rudder. I would place the propellers directly below the propeller-guards, which, as the name implies, meant to protect the propellers from any contact with piers, and other ships' hulls.
BTW, I can't see any difference in the two Sniper class drawings :(

_________________
[ img ] Thank you Kim for the crest

"Never fear to try on something new. Remember that the Titanic was built by professionals, and the Ark by an amateur"


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
SrGopher
Post subject: Re: The Centennial AUPosted: July 18th, 2012, 12:24 am
Offline
Posts: 371
Joined: April 13th, 2011, 9:21 pm
Oh, well that was a mistake....the correct drawing of the Sniper has been uploaded, and the corrections to the Sharpshooter have been made:
[ img ]

_________________
Worklist:
Puerto Oeste - AU - WWI-WWII


Top
[Profile] [Quote]
Display: Sort by: Direction:
[Post Reply]  Page 6 of 9  [ 84 posts ]  Return to “Alternate Universe Designs” | Go to page « 14 5 6 7 8 9 »

Jump to: 

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests


The team | Delete all board cookies | All times are UTC


cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Limited
[ GZIP: Off ]