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KIKE92
Post subject: Republic of VenezuelaPosted: October 14th, 2012, 10:03 am
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Republic of Venezuela:

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Venezuela, officially called the Republic of Venezuela, is a country on the northern coast of South America. Venezuela's territory covers around 1.226.038 km2 (473.376,29 sq mi) with an estimated population around 33.416.000. Venezuela is considered a state with extremely high biodiversity, with habitats ranging from the Andes Mountains in the west to the Amazon Basin rainforest in the south, via extensive llanos plains and Caribbean coast in the center and the Orinoco River Delta in the east. Venezuela is among the most urbanized countries in Latin America, the vast majority of Venezuelans live in the cities of the north, especially in the capital, Caracas, which is also the largest city in Venezuela. Since the discovery of oil in the early 20th century, Venezuela has the world's largest oil reserves and has been one of the world's leading exporters of oil. Previously an underdeveloped exporter of agricultural commodities such as coffee and cocoa, oil quickly came to dominate exports and government revenues.

Manpower:

-Population: 33.416.000
-Available manpower: 16.579.226
-Fit for service: 12.676.239
-Reaching military age annually: 610.120
-Active military manpower: 330.740
-Active reserve military manpower: 438.000

Geographic:

-Area: 1.226.038,82 Km2 (nº24)
-Coastline: 3.149 Km
-Waterway Coverage: 5.933 Km
-Regions: 24 states, Federal district & federal dependencies

Financial:

-Oil revenue (Per year): $365.912.500.000$
-Defense budget: 49.229.210.301$
-External Debt: 74.870.000.000$
-Reserves of Foreign Exchange and Gold: 21.150.000.000$
-Purchasing Power Parity:
-Total: $407.400.000.000$

Resources:

-Proven Oil Reserves: 297.600.000.000 Barrels
-Oil Production: 3.729.375 Barrels per day
-Oil Consumption: 1.600.000 Barrels per day

Logistical:

-Labor force: 15.571.000
-Merchant marine strenght: 53
-Major ports and terminals: 5
-Roadway coverage: 220.520
-Railway coverage: 3.653
-Serviceable airports: 444

Background

The territory currently known as Venezuela was colonized by Spain in 1522 amid resistance from indigenous peoples. In 1811, it became one of the first Spanish-American colonies to declare independence, which was not securely established until 1821, when Venezuela was a department of the federal republic of Gran Colombia. It gained full independence as a separate country in 1830. During the 19th century, Venezuela suffered political turmoil and autocracy, remaining dominated by regional caudillos (military strongmen) until the mid-20th century. Since 1958, the country has had a series of democratic governments. Economic shocks in the 1980s and 1990s led to several political crises, including the deadly Caracazo riots of 1989, two attempted coups in 1992, and the impeachment of President Carlos Andrés Pérez for embezzlement of public funds in 1993. A collapse in confidence in the existing parties saw the 1998 election of former coup-involved career officer Hugo Chávez and the launch of the Bolivarian Revolution, beginning with a 1999 Constituent Assembly to write a new Constitution of Venezuela.

In 2014, a series of protests, political demonstrations, and civil insurrection began in Venezuela due to the country's high levels of violence, inflation, and chronic shortages of basic goods attributed to economic policies such as strict price controls.The majority of protests had been peaceful, consisting of demonstrations, sit-ins, and hunger strikes, with an estimated 52% of protests in opposition to the government and smaller numbers in support of various economic and social policy changes. However, small groups of protestors had been responsible for attacks on public property, such as government buildings and public transportation. Erecting improvised street barricades, dubbed guarimbas, was the most common form of protest, although their use was controversial.

Although the protest reached high levels of intensity and spread all over the country they slowly started to lose intensity by the end of 2014. It wasn't until July 2015 with a rampant crime, corruption, food shortages and fraudulent legislative elections that a new wave of protest erupted across the country. This time the protest were violent with mobs demanding the resignation of President and Cabinet and attacking government buildings and blocking most of the major highways and avenues effectively paralyzing the country’s most important cities. Realizing they were losing control of the country the socialist government decided to use its paramilitary groups and militias to try suffocate he protest, the initial wave of repression ended up with hundreds dead and thousands injured or arrested but this did not have the effect the government had expected as it only helped to fuel the protest even more. After seeing that protesters would not back down the government started threatening the population with using the National Guard if the protesters did not go back to their homes. This decision triggered a massive military reaction from the nationalist faction inside of the Venezuelan Armed Forces which remained loyal to the original Republic of Venezuela. On 5 July 2015 the nationalist faction of the armed forces started a military operation to take down the government and eliminate the revolution started by Chavez. The uprising included elements from the Army, Air Force and Navy, in the morning of the 5th of July F-16’s from Maracay started bombing the presidential palace and paramilitary strongholds and establishing a no fly zone in the capital while army armored units advanced towards Miraflores. Many government officials were caught trying to escape the country and wee immediately taken prisoners by the military. By 8:00 PM army tanks and infantry had reached the presidential palace were they had managed to defeat the presidential guard and the militias and take the president as well as many other key government officials who were taken into custody by the army effectively overthrowing the government and bringing 15 years of socialism to an abrupt end. The next day a military junta took control of the government and formed a joint civilian-military government to stabilize the country and guarantee a safe transition to democracy with the candidate of the newly formed Venezuelan Nationalist Party being elected as president by a majority of the vote in October.

After the end of the Bolivarian revolution the new Venezuelan government found itself in a very difficult situation, in order to solve the problems a massive modernization program was launched, using the money from oil sales and also the money taken from corrupt government officials many of which had been stealing money and resources since 1999. The massive amount of money collected allowed the new administration to solve the food shortages, electrical blackouts, education among others. One of the consequences of Chavez's expropriations was the great number of nationalised business and companies had been bankrupted, this meant that it was up to the government to manage them, immediately the administration started pumping money into this companies and also an aggressive campaign was launched to attract national and foreign investors although some industries such as oil would remain nationalised. One of the main goals of the modernization project was to diversify the Venezuelan economy and make it independent of oil. The strategy promoted economic growth through labor-intensive manufactured exports, in which Venezuela could develop a competitive advantage. Government initiatives played an important role in this process. The inflow of foreign capital was greatly encouraged to supplement the shortage of domestic savings at the beginning. These efforts enabled Venezuela to achieve rapid growth in exports and subsequent increases in income.

The new government based most of its policies in a doctrine known as “Nuevo ideal nacional” (New national ideal) that had been used in Venezuela from 1950 to 1958 and had effectively turned it into the most powerful country in South America in less than five years. The original doctrine of the 1950’s sought to make Venezuela an influential power in the hemisphere, following its historical tradition and role in liberating five Latin American nations and being a fundamental piece in the continental balance of power.


Territory

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Economy

The Central Bank of Venezuela is responsible for developing monetary policy for the Venezuelan bolívar which is used as currency. The currency is primarily printed on paper and distributed throughout the country. The President of the Central Bank of Venezuela also serves as the country's representative in the International Monetary Fund.

Venezuela had a Market-based mixed economy dominated by the petroleum sector, which accounted for roughly a third of GDP, around 80% of exports, and more than half of government revenues. Since the discovery of oil in the early 20th century, Venezuela has been one of the world's leading exporters of oil, and it is a founding member of OPEC. Previously an underdeveloped exporter of agricultural commodities such as coffee and cocoa, oil quickly came to dominate exports and government revenues. Although this figures would start changing as the new policies started to be applied and the economy became increasingly diverse.

Manufacturing contributed 17% of GDP in 2006 this figure had increased to 42% by 2020 with Venezuela manufacturing and exporting heavy industry products such as steel, aluminium and cement, with production concentrating around Ciudad Guayana, and new production facilities being built in the Zulia state. The Guri Dam, one of the largest in the world and the provider of about three-quarters of Venezuela's electricity had suffered many maintenance problems during the Chavez government relating mainly to corruption and lack of maintenance, causing numerous blackouts all over the country and in order to solve the problems an ambitious upgrade program was launched for the dam and construction of other dams were launched in other parts of the country. In order to reduce Venezuela’s dependence on oil great emphasis was placed on the development of alternative energies such as Wind power, Ethanol biofuels, Solar energy & Geothermal electricity.


Military

The National Armed Forces of the Republic of Venezuela (Fuerza Armada Nacional, FAN) are the overall unified military forces of Venezuela. It includes over 320,150 men and women, under Article 328 of the Constitution, in 4 components of Ground, Sea and Air. The components of the National Armed Forces are: the Venezuelan Army, the Venezuelan Navy, the Venezuelan Air Force and the Venezuelan National Guard.

The President of Venezuela is the commander-in-chief of the national armed forces. The main roles of the armed forces are to defend the sovereign national territory of Venezuela, airspace, and islands, fight against drug trafficking, to search and rescue and, in the case of a natural disaster, civil protection. All male citizens of Venezuela have a constitutional duty to register for the military service at the age of 18, which is the age of majority in Venezuela.

Founder of the South American Defence Organization (SADO) with Brazil, Colombia, Perú, Chile, Pánama, Argentina, Ecuador, Paraguay & Uruguay

Land systems:

-Tanks (MBT/Light): 1.400
-Armored figting vehicles: 2.514
-Self-propelled guns: 198
-Towed artillery pieces: 510
-Rocket projectors (MLRS): 84

Naval power:

-Total strenght: 68
-Aircraft Carriers: 8
-Frigates: 12
-Destroyers: 10
-Corvettes: 8
-Submarines: 14
-Patrol craft: 20
-Mine warfare: 0

Air power:

-Total aircraft: 3.040
-Fighters/Interceptors: 766
-Attack aircraft: 596
-Transport aircraft: 261
-Trainer aircraft: 318
-Helicopters: 853
-Attack helicopters: 246

Venezuelan Air force:
The Venezuelan Air Force (FAV), is one of the five components of the National Armed Forces, whose objectives are to safeguard the airspace of Venezuela, contributing to the maintenance of internal order, actively participate in the development of the country and ensure the territorial integrity and the sovereignty of the nation.

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Venezuelan Navy:
The Navy of Venezuela (Spanish: Armada de Venezuela) serves the purpose of defending the naval sovereignty of the country, including inland and fluvial security, and it also serves to prevent illegal activities in the Venezuelan borders and collaborates with international organizations to safeguard international waters from criminal activities.

Aircraft carriers: (x4)

-Táchira Class:


The Táchira/Brasilia class is a class of eight aircraft carriers built for the Venezuelan Navy and the Brazilian Navy. The eight vessels were the first aircraft carriers to be designed and built in Venezuela and Brazil. They were built by Dianca Shipyard and Arsenal de Marinha do Rio de Janeiro in cooperation with UCOCAR, ASTIMARCA and EMGEPRON, with DCNS and Fincantieri providing technical assistance. Their the first South American nuclear-powered surface vessels, and the second class of nuclear-powered carriers completed outside of the United States. Development of the ships started separately with the Brazilian Navy looking a suitable replacement for the old BNS São Paulo A12 (Ex Foch) which had experienced many technical difficulties through out its career. On the other hand the Venezuelan project started as a result of an ambitious rearmament program that was conceived to make the Venezuelan Armed Forces self sufficient and capable of fighting against far more powerful countries such as the United States, Russia or China. Since both programs had similar goals it was decided that it would be more effective if both countries worked together on the design, development and construction of the ships. So in 2016 a contract between the two governments and their main shipbuilding companies was signed in which they agreed to develop a common carrier, but since neither Venezuela nor Brazil had any experience in the construction of aircraft carriers DCNS of France and Fincantieri of Italy were brought into the project as technical advisers.

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-ARV Táchira – PA-1 is the lead ship of the Táchira-class of aircraft carriers, the largest warship ever built for the Venezuelan Navy and capable of carrying up to eighty aircraft. She was named after the state Táchira on 5 July 2022 and it was commissioned in early 2032, with initial operational capability from 2033.

-ARV Simón Bolívar – PA-2 is the second ship of the Táchira-class of aircraft carriers. She was named after Venezuela’s liberator on his birthday the 24 July 2022 and it was commissioned in early 2033, with initial operational capability from 2034.

-ARV Francisco de Miranda – PA-3 is the Third ship of the Táchira-class of aircraft carriers. She was named after Venezuelan revolutionary Francisco de Miranda on the 14 July 2023 to commemorate the 203rd anniversary of his death and it was commissioned in early 2035, with initial operational capability from 2036.

-ARV Marcos Evangelista Pérez Jiménez – PA-4 is the fourth ship of the Táchira-class of aircraft carriers. She was named after Venezuela’s 37th president on his birthday the 25th April 2023 and it was commissioned in late 2035, with initial operational capability from 2036.

Amphibious assault ship: (x4)

-Lara Class:

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• PH-1 Lara
• PH-2 Maracaibo
• PH-3 Ávila
• PH-4 Monagas

Destroyers: (x11)

-Zulia Class:


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• D-52 Zulia
• D-53 Juan Bautista Arismendi
• D-54 Luis Brión
• D-55 José Antonio Páez
• D-56 José María Vargas
• D-57 Cipriano Castro
• D-58 Pedro Gual
• D-59 Carlos Soublette
• D-60 Antonio José de Sucre
• D-61 José Tadeo Monagas
• D-62 Antonio Guzmán Blanco

Frigates: (x12)

-Vargas Class:


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• F-40 Vargas
• F-41 José Prudencio Padilla
• F-42 José Antonio Anzoátegui
• F-43 Antonio Nicolás Briceño
• F-44 Santos Michelena
• F-45 José Félix Ribas
• F-46 José María Carreño
• F-47 Juan Crisóstomo Falcón
• F-48 Rómulo Gallegos
• F-49 Carlos Delgado Chalbaud
• F-50 Isaías Medina Angarita
• F-51 Andrés Narvarte

Corvette: (x4)

-Guaiqueri Class:


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• PC-21 Guaiqueri
• PC-22 Warao
• PC-23 Yekuana
• PC-24 Kariña

Logistic support: (x4)

-Amazonas Class:


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• T-82 Amazonas
• T-83 Jacinto Lara
• T-84 Atanasio Girardot
• T-85 Manuel Gual

Fast attack craft: (x8)

-Falcón Class:


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• LRA-1 Falcón
• LRA-2 Manuel Piar
• LRA-3 Pedro Camejo
• LRA-4 Santiago Mariño
• LRA-5 Hermógenes Maza
• LRA-6 José Loreto Arismendi
• LRA-7 Francisco Tomás Morales
• LRA-8 Juan Pablo Briceño Pacheco

-Monágas Class:

[ img ]

Submarines: (x10)

-Róbalo Class:


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• S-33 Róbalo
• S-34 Mako
• S-35 Carite
• S-36 Reivindicador
• S-37 Guri
• S-38 Intrépido

-Mérida Class:

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• S-39 Mérida
• S-40 Orinoco
• S-41 Apure
• S-42 Caroní

-Aragua Class

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Naval Aviation:

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Venezuelan Marine Corps

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Venezuelan Coast Guard:

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Ocean patrol vessels: (x24)

-Guaicamacuto Class:


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• GC-21 Guaicamacuto
• GC-22 Yavire
• GC-23 Naiguata
• GC-24 Tamanaco

- Caríte Class (x12)

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- Mero Class (x10)

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- Margarita Class (x8)

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Venezuelan Ministry of Emergency Situatons:

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Venezuelan National Guard:

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Venezuelan Army:
The National Army of Venezuela is one of the four professional branches of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Venezuela It has the responsibility for land-based operations against external, or internal threats that may put the sovereignty of the nation at risk. It is the largest military branch of Venezuela and the second in Latin America, which in 24 June 1821 won a huge military victory against the Empire of Spain, which led to the independence of the nation. It later contributed to the independence of the present-day countries of Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Peru, and Bolivia.

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Viasa-Aeropostal:

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The Viasa - Aeropostal Group is a Latin American airline holding company incorporated under Venezuelan law with its headquarters at Caracas, Venezuela. Viasa - Aeropostal Group is the result of the merger between VIASA and Aeropostal which took place in 2016. The two airlines fly with separate liveries and certificates, but expect substantial synergies from merging their operations. Viasa takes care of international flights and Aeropostal concentrates on Domestic flights.

Background (Conviasa)

In January 1997, Venezuela's former flag carrier, Viasa, ceased operations after 37 years of service due to prolonged financial problems. In May 2001, the idea to create a new flag carrier for Venezuela was proposed, but in December 2002, the project was put on hold until 1 October 2003. On 30 March 2004, the President of Venezuela, Hugo Chávez, signed a decree that formally established the airline. This decree was published in the nation's official gazette the next day.

On 28 November 2004, Conviasa's inaugural flight was made with a De Havilland Canada Dash 7 aircraft flying from the airport in Charallave to the Santiago Mariño International Airport, on Margarita Island. On 10 December 2004, Conviasa formally began its national and international operations. Conviasa was originally run by the now defunct Ministry of Production and Commerce (Ministerio de la Producción y el Comercio), but it has since been taken over by the Ministry of Infrastructure. The airline was plagued by problems which ranged from ageing aircraft and poor service to maintenance problems the latter proving its magnitude after the European Union banned the airline from flying in its territory.

New VIASA

After the new government was elected an intense reorganization of the airline started which included the return to the original name VIASA. After the company’s name was changed it was decided that VIASA would be merged with Aeropostal to form a larger airline with a structure that resembled the philosophy behind the original VIASA were Aeropostal would control national routes and VIASA would take the international flights. Working with an ageing fleet the management decided to purchase new aircraft to replace the oldest aircraft and reassign the newer ones. In early 2016 the fleet was composed by 20 E190’s, 4 CRJ700’s, 2 ATR-72-200’s, 6 Grand Caravan’s, 1 A340-200 and 5 MD-82’s. The Boeing 737-200’s had been retired a year earlier due to their age and replaced by the Embraer E190. In order to start expanding the airlines destinations a large number of orders were placed by the airline for Airbus aircraft which included 10 A320’s, 4 A330-200 and 2 A330-300 with the first aircraft arriving in late 2016.

The company’s restructuring coupled with the Venezuelan economy’s recovery helped fuel the airlines growth not only in fleet size but in the number of destinations. Immediately after the new aircraft arrived new routes were opened, among them London, New York, Barcelona, Frankfurt, Milan and Paris all of which were covered with the new A330’s. In 2017 the airline had a revenue of 3.5 billion dollars and a net income 450 million dollars which was much bigger than any of the previous years, this was a clear sign that the new policies were working and as a result the second phase of the expansion began in late 2018 with a new package of orders for 8 ATR-72-600 and 10 Dash-8 Q400’s for Aeropostal and 4 A330-200, 4 A330-300, 10 A320’s, 6 A321’s and 4 Boeing 777-300ER’s for Viasa which started entering service in 2018. The arrival of new aircraft allowed the airline to open new routes with one of the most significant being Caracas – Dubai flown by a Boeing 777-300ER and constantly ranks as one of Viasa’s most profitable routes.

Industry: Aviation

Founded: 2016

Fleet size: 461 (Inluding subsidiaries)

- Viasa (126)
- Aeropostal (42)
- Viasa Cargo (15)
- Varig (146)
- Mexicana (88)
- Avensa (44)

Headquarters:

- Simón Bolívar International Airport (SVMI)
- Caracas, Venezuela

Products:

- Passenger flights
- Cargo activity
- Aircraft maintenance
- Catering

-Subsidiaries

-Wholly owned:

- Viasa
- Viasa Cargo
- Aeropostal
- Varig
- Mexicana

-Minority interests:

- Avensa 30%

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[ img ]

_________________
Republic of Venezuela: http://www.shipbucket.com/forums/viewto ... =14&t=3610
United States of Venezuela: http://www.shipbucket.com/forums/viewto ... =14&t=5505
kike-92: http://kike-92.deviantart.com/


Last edited by KIKE92 on October 4th, 2015, 3:48 pm, edited 64 times in total.

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KIKE92
Post subject: Re: Republic of VenezuelaPosted: October 14th, 2012, 10:11 am
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Joined: July 26th, 2012, 12:29 pm
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Other countries:

- Brazil:
[ img ]

[ img ]

CVN-Brasilia Class (x4)

-BNS Brasília – A13 is the lead ship of the Brasília-class of aircraft carriers, the largest warship ever built for the Brazilian Navy and capable of carrying up to eighty aircraft. She was named after the Brazilian capital on 21 April 2018 and it was commissioned in early 2020, with initial operational capability from 2021.

-BNS Mina Gerais – A14 is the second of the Brasília-class of aircraft carriers. She was named after the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais on 10 August 2018 and it was commissioned in late 2020, with initial operational capability from 2022.

-BNS Riachuelo – A15 is the third of the Brasília-class of aircraft carriers. She was named in honor of the battle of Riachuelo on 10 June 2019 and it was commissioned in early 2021, with initial operational capability from 2023.

-BNS Pernambuco – A16 is the second of the Brasília-class of aircraft carriers. She was named after the Brazilian state of Pernambuco on 20 August 2019 and it was commissioned in late 2021, with initial operational capability from 2023.

[ img ]

LHD-Manaus Class (x4)
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FFG-Rio de Janeiro Class (x16)
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- Colombia:
[ img ]

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LHA-Bogota Class (x2)
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FFG-Cali Class (x4)
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FFG-Medellin Class (x6)
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- Argentina:
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CV - 9 de Julio Class (x1)

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- Chile:
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FFG-Valparaíso Class (x8)
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- Cuba:
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- Paraguay:
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- Panama:
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- Mexico:
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FFG-Alamo Class (x6)
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FS-Guadalajara Class (x8)
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OPV-Guadalajara Class (x6)
[ img ]

- Perú:
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- South Africa:
[ img ]

_________________
Republic of Venezuela: http://www.shipbucket.com/forums/viewto ... =14&t=3610
United States of Venezuela: http://www.shipbucket.com/forums/viewto ... =14&t=5505
kike-92: http://kike-92.deviantart.com/


Last edited by KIKE92 on September 23rd, 2015, 7:30 pm, edited 21 times in total.

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acelanceloet
Post subject: Re: Republic of VenezuelaPosted: October 14th, 2012, 10:15 am
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crediting the original authors of the ships you modified is required. also, please use the latest parts (if you cannot find which, I will try to help, just ask)

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[ img ]
Drawings are credited with J.Scholtens
I ask of you to prove me wrong. Not say I am wrong, but prove it, because then I will have learned something new.


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KIKE92
Post subject: Re: Republic of VenezuelaPosted: October 14th, 2012, 10:19 am
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Joined: July 26th, 2012, 12:29 pm
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which are the one´s i have to change

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Republic of Venezuela: http://www.shipbucket.com/forums/viewto ... =14&t=3610
United States of Venezuela: http://www.shipbucket.com/forums/viewto ... =14&t=5505
kike-92: http://kike-92.deviantart.com/


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Rhade
Post subject: Re: Republic of VenezuelaPosted: October 14th, 2012, 10:21 am
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Lot's of work here ... well also remember about proper template with Shipbucket logo. ;)

For now, there is serious overpower in terms of everything, but maybe some background will explain how Venezuela acquired such power.

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Nobody expects the Imperial Inquisition!


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Thiel
Post subject: Re: Republic of VenezuelaPosted: October 14th, 2012, 10:21 am
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You'll have to change the credits on all the drawings if I'm not mistaken.

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That which does not kill me has made a grave tactical error

Worklist

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KIKE92
Post subject: Re: Republic of VenezuelaPosted: October 14th, 2012, 10:24 am
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ok i will do a little update when im finished i will post them again

I used a template and i changed the author so i hope its right

_________________
Republic of Venezuela: http://www.shipbucket.com/forums/viewto ... =14&t=3610
United States of Venezuela: http://www.shipbucket.com/forums/viewto ... =14&t=5505
kike-92: http://kike-92.deviantart.com/


Last edited by KIKE92 on October 14th, 2012, 2:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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TimothyC
Post subject: Re: Republic of VenezuelaPosted: October 14th, 2012, 1:27 pm
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That is correct template use and formatting.

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MATHNET - To Cogitate and to Solve


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seeker36340
Post subject: Re: Republic of VenezuelaPosted: October 14th, 2012, 1:48 pm
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is this pre, post or non-Chavez? *lol*

The T-1 MBT looks interesting...is it a native design?


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heuhen
Post subject: Re: Republic of VenezuelaPosted: October 14th, 2012, 1:58 pm
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seeker36340 wrote:
is this pre, post or non-Chavez? *lol*

The T-1 MBT looks interesting...is it a native design?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopard_1


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