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RegiaMarina1939
Post subject: Re: William Walkers NicaraguaPosted: January 16th, 2017, 6:42 pm
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-the edited drawing and backstory for my steam sloop will be uploaded in just a few minutes. I will work on the sailing vessel in short time. The hull shape has been changed, aft gun removed, and other minor changes have been made.

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reytuerto
Post subject: Re: William Walkers NicaraguaPosted: January 16th, 2017, 7:37 pm
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Hi Regia Marina:
Intresting story! Please, check the placement of the screw in your sloops, in its actual position, it looks like a "cut" in the hull. Cheers.


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RegiaMarina1939
Post subject: Re: William Walkers NicaraguaPosted: January 16th, 2017, 10:47 pm
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reytuerto wrote:
Hi Regia Marina:
Intresting story! Please, check the placement of the screw in your sloops, in its actual position, it looks like a "cut" in the hull. Cheers.
Thanks! I changed it around a bit. Hope it looks better now.

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RegiaMarina1939
Post subject: Re: William Walkers NicaraguaPosted: January 18th, 2017, 3:01 am
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[ img ]

-In 1861, the start of the American Civil War made it necessary for additional coast-defense measures to be added to Nicaraguan ports on both the East and West Coasts. This included the construction of new batteries to protect the key ports, and the re-activation of the old-era Spanish forts. However, the fleet saw the need for new vessels that were able to intercept an enemy from a distance offshore. However, the navy did not have the capability as it was to build an ironclad domestically, and all American yards were busy with war construction. At the start of the war, there were several American steamers in port on the East Coast who were not risking to leave from the threat of Confederate Raiders. The navy conducted an inspection of these, and found several to be suitable for service in the fleet. Several were outfitted as gunboats, but the Admiralty eventually set it's sights on a shallow-draft twin-screw steamer, the Redhawk, built in New York and used a passenger/cargo steamer in the Caribbean. The fleet was looking for vessels suitable for conversion to ironclads, and saw real potential in the Redhawk. She was recently-built and strong in her structure, with a very powerful engine plant for a merchant steamer. She was to be converted to a several-hundred ton ironclad steam ram, and to that end she was laid up at an improvised shipyard in Puerto Cabezas harbor, where engineers beached her and cut her down the water's edge, with an iron-plated casemate built on top... she was completed in 1862 and commissioned that same year.

Around 60 meters long and displacing close to 1,200 tons, she had a deep draft for an ironclad of her type at around 17 feet. This made it difficult for her to access any shallow rivers or inlets, but she was intended to defend deep water harbors on the Eastern Seaboard of the country rather than inland waterways so this feature didn't impact her greatly.

She was armed with American guns imported via covert high-speed steamer, these being 2 x 50-lb. Dahlgren rifles and 8 x 20-lb. Parrott Rifles. The guns were mounted on new-type friction carriages made to an American design. The carriages were made on-site.

Triunfo was propelled by a single horizontal back-acting steam engine fueled by 2 main, 1 auxiliary coal fired Martin-type boilers. She attained a maximum speed of 9 knots in calm seas. Her funnel was fitted with gratings during re-construction to stop debris and projectiles from falling into the boilers and crippling the power plants.

The new ironworks in the city (which was the main navy base in the Caribbean sea) used British-built hydraulic presses to convert 2-inch wide railroad rails into 2 1/2 inch-thick plates that were 8 inches wide. They were laid over a casemate built onto the hull, made from wooden beams secured by iron rivets and fastenings. Backing the iron plating was 21 inches of solid wood. For budgetary reasons and in order to complete her as fast as possible, she was left unfouled and unpainted until after the war, a feature that caused her service life to end quickly.

She was commissioned in 1862 and immediately was placed on patrol along the East Coast of the country. She sighted some Confederate steamers and fired a few shots, but was unable to sink them. During 1863, she spent some time on long distance patrol around Cuba, assisting with the capture of two confederate blockade runners. After this, she was returned home as a coast defense ironclad once again. She spent the war in this role, and was relegated to reserve service in 1870 after the war. Disarmed and hulked in 1878, she was scrapped 2 years later.

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RegiaMarina1939

Current Worklist:
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-Emperia Group AU
-FD scale diesel trucks


Last edited by RegiaMarina1939 on December 31st, 2017, 5:29 am, edited 7 times in total.

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RegiaMarina1939
Post subject: Re: William Walkers NicaraguaPosted: January 18th, 2017, 3:15 am
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.

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RegiaMarina1939

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-Nicaragua AU
-Emperia Group AU
-FD scale diesel trucks


Last edited by RegiaMarina1939 on January 5th, 2021, 10:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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RegiaMarina1939
Post subject: Re: William Walkers NicaraguaPosted: January 21st, 2017, 10:12 pm
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[ img ]

-The cruisers of the La Cruz-class, La Cruz and San Juan del Norte, where the topic of extensive debate among the admiralty and political figures of the time. They were far larger and manpower-intensive than anything yet built for the navy, and would be the most powerful steam-and-sail ships in all of Central America, being on par with even the vessels of the USA. Eventually, the funding for both was provided due to the fear of civil war in both Honduras and the United States, and they were ordered from John Laird and Sons in England. The facilities for handling them were also funded by the same emergency spending increase, which included the expansion of the dockyard at Puerto Cabezas (received 2 new steam cranes as well as an additional drydock for handling the new ships) and the construction of an entirely new base and dockyard at San Juan del Sur on the West Coast. They were ordered in 1859, laid down the same year, and completed and commissioned in 1861.

-The ships were nearly 80 meters long overall, from their stern to the tip of the bowsprit. They were typical British steam-and-sail vessels, with two tall, swept-back masts, smooth lines, and a central funnel. However, she did incorporate some new, interesting features, including the addition of an armored conning tower just forward of the foremast, for the purpose of housing an admiral and his command staff during a fleet action.

-As for propulsion, they had 6 rectangular coal-fired boilers powering 2 x trunk-type steam engines. The engines were manufactured by John Penn and Company, who were already contracted for the engines to be fitted on HMS Warrior. The machinery bid was close, with the Penn Company narrowly winning out over the Maudslay Company after a lengthy decision process. Top speed of 15 knots under sail and steam, 7 under steam only, and 9 under sail. The screw was fixed, and could not be raised. There was a clutch system to engage and disengage it, and it turned freely when not in use.

-The armament fitted to both vessels was of typical British fashion as well, and very reminiscent of the follow-on ship built by the same company, the CSS Alabama (Ironically, Alabama would be the ships only foe in a battle). The broadside armament was originally composed of 8 x 32-pounder naval smooth-bores, while the bow and stern swivel guns were of the 40-pounder Armstrong rifled breech-loading type. The bulwarks could collapse to either side of the swivel guns to allow them a wide firing arc to either side of the vessel. The 32-pounder smooth-bores were replaced by 20-pounder rifled Parrott muzzle-loaders in 1873, while the swivel guns were left in their original positions.

-The vessels entered service in 1861, when they finished fitting out, which was a long and drawn-out task because of the quick building time and several minor flaws that needed rectification. Deployed with the Pacific fleet, they were tasked in 1862 with finding the raider Alabama. They sighted her off the coast of Java on 12 December, 1863. The commander gave the signal for both ships to raise steam, as they were anchored in the straights of Malacca. They gave chase to the Alabama, which raised its sails and gone to full steam, and was now moving away to North-Northwest at a speed of 12 knots. The ships, after 5 minutes of raising steam, had reached a speed of 9 knots, and where closing in on the raider. La Cruz moved to her port side, having now achieved a combined speed of 14 knots, while the Alabama was making 13, which was her maximum speed. They came within firing range, and the order was given to run out the guns. The Alabama fired both her swivel guns, a 68-pounder and a 110-pounder. The 110-pounder shell slammed into La Cruz's after section, partially disabling her steering gear. Her captain dropped speed to assess the damage. Meanwhile, her forward Armstrong gun fired at the Alabama, hitting her stern gallery and causing a fire from an oil lamp that was promptly doused by the crew. By now, San Juan had closed the gap and begun firing. Two 24-pound shells hit the Alabama, disabling two of her broadside guns. However, Alabama now fired her aft swivel gun at San Juan. The shot slammed into her side, and penetrated a steam pipe connecting two of the boilers. The pipe burst, killing two crewmen. San Juan dropped to 7 knots speed from the serious loss of steam. La Cruz had built up steam and cruised at 9 knots back into the fight. She fired a 32-pound gun at the Alabama, but at extreme range the shot fell short. Alabama escaped and headed back to the Indian Ocean, away from the two vessels. They were returned to the Potosi Yard for repairs, and served the rest of the war in coast patrol duty. Re-armed in 1873, they served until 1880, when they were scrapped in favor of all-iron ships.

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RegiaMarina1939

Current Worklist:
-Real designs
-Nicaragua AU
-Emperia Group AU
-FD scale diesel trucks


Last edited by RegiaMarina1939 on January 2nd, 2018, 3:25 am, edited 5 times in total.

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RegiaMarina1939
Post subject: Re: William Walkers NicaraguaPosted: January 24th, 2017, 10:40 pm
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[ img ]

-Just a little compilation of the work done so far on this AU. I will do a few uploads on the CCCN AU pretty soon, and then upload a new set of iron ships here.

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RegiaMarina1939

Current Worklist:
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-Nicaragua AU
-Emperia Group AU
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RegiaMarina1939
Post subject: Re: William Walkers NicaraguaPosted: January 24th, 2017, 10:43 pm
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Is the image working for everyone else or is it just me?

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Current Worklist:
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Tobius
Post subject: Re: William Walkers NicaraguaPosted: January 24th, 2017, 10:53 pm
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RegiaMarina1939 wrote:
[ img ]

-Just a little compilation of the work done so far on this AU. I will do a few uploads on the CCCN AU pretty soon, and then upload a new set of iron ships here.
[ img ]

It's the original embedded link. The string is corrupted.

** Disclaimer: the work is the intellectual property of RegiaMarina et all and the link belongs to them and him.


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RegiaMarina1939
Post subject: Re: William Walkers NicaraguaPosted: January 25th, 2017, 1:44 am
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Tobius wrote:
RegiaMarina1939 wrote:
[ img ]

-Just a little compilation of the work done so far on this AU. I will do a few uploads on the CCCN AU pretty soon, and then upload a new set of iron ships here.
[ img ]

It's the original embedded link. The string is corrupted.

** Disclaimer: the work is the intellectual property of RegiaMarina et all and the link belongs to them and him.
Thanks for that! Sorry, this is my first time using drop box.

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RegiaMarina1939

Current Worklist:
-Real designs
-Nicaragua AU
-Emperia Group AU
-FD scale diesel trucks


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